44-GEOPOLITICAL SANDWICH

WWII had been needed because, during WWI, Lenin had refused to enter the war and create an eastern front like the City had expected, and the City had had no choice but to terminate a war that had become a senseless war of attrition, and get rid of Lenin. The City bankers decided that if Russia was to be counted on to create an eastern front in the upcoming WWII, and eventually play a scarecrow role as the mighty USSR after the war, another strong man was needed at the helm. By 1928 Stalin had introduced his five-year plan.

In 1929, Stalin called for the liquidation of the Kulaks as a class, and the Red Purges were officially carried out between 1936 and 1938. In 1922, Lenin had introduced a New Economic Policy that had allowed the Kulaks to own their crops, and Stalin decided to put an end to it, starving and killing as many as twenty million citizens in the process. According to this monster, in order for the USSR to catch up with the world, everybody had to work for the state, and that’s all there was to it. Naturally, Russia was transformed into the formidable police state that a lot of us later got to know.

Though Russia lost another twenty million of its people during WWII, in geopolitical terms, the Second World War was a complete success. With the hordes of Eastern European Jews bent on reaching America forcefully rounded-up and sent to work for the German war machine before being shipped to Palestine at the end of the war, Israel was on the road to becoming a state. With the pound destroyed along with Germany and Japan, the City bankers could now concentrate on forcing the European nations to work together, and on turning China into a great market economy. Since the City bankers knew the European Union market was not going to be as easy to create as the Chinese one, they decided to speed things up by creating a European geopolitical sandwich.

Prior to WWII, Russia had been merely a shell of a nation. But thanks to the American lend-lease program, the City had armed the nation and Russia had ‘won’ the war. Now, all that was left to do was transform Russia into a virtual superpower, the USSR, a country that would be perceived as a worthy U.S. foe.

The world would henceforth have two major league teams: the U.S. would be team ‘A’, and the USSR, team ‘B’. They were to threaten each other in order to create tension, but they were never meant to shoot at each other, and never did. Both teams did the bidding of the bankers in the City, and if there’s any doubt, all we have to do is look at the role the USSR played in Afghanistan, Egypt, Algeria, Cuba, and other parts of the world before it collapsed like a house of cards. However, the main purpose for having these two teams after the war was to create a monster geopolitical sandwich, a sandwich with Europe in the middle of two bigger-than-life military powers, the U.S. and the USSR. Having lost its will to fight after two world wars, and being constantly threatened with nuclear annihilation, Europe would naturally be eager to unite and protect itself against those two big bullies. As planned, the cold war did not see a single shot fired between the two “superpowers,” and the Treaty of Maastricht was signed at about the same time the Berlin Wall was torn down in 1989.

Russia was a huge, bankrupt country that had always known a feudal serf system. It had been a nation with no market economy, no infrastructure, and its citizens didn’t even have indoor plumbing, yet lo and behold, underdeveloped Russia miraculously becomes a superpower overnight, and takes off for the stars. In no time at all, it had rockets and Sputniks, nuclear bombs and missiles, and it was threatening to blow up the whole world. Intercontinental bombers and nuclear submarines were being built in record number and in record time, or so the Gorgon Sisters told us. The City was obviously building the most impressive scarecrow it could dream up as fast as it could. Russia’s MIGS were even equipped with Rolls-Royce engines. Russia had a lot of missiles, but we’ll never know how many of them were equipped with nuclear warheads. The City was erecting an imaginary apocalyptic structure that would be so threatening and so ever-present in people’s minds, especially now that there was a television set in everybody’s living room, that it would sow terror in the heart of the citizens of the world. Russia became a phenomenal scarecrow that was used in a masterful propaganda campaign that lasted forty-odd years.

The City had set up the Russian scarecrow for everyone to see. It financed the Sputnik project in 1957 and stuffed the ensuing images in all the television sets of America and the world, thereby turning the USSR into a bigger-than-life foe. When the Berlin Wall was built in 1961, and especially when Nikita Khrushchev allegedly gave atomic bomb carrying missiles to Cuba in 1962, the USSR was perceived as the baddest superpower the world could imagine.

As expected, with the U.S. on one side and the USSR on the other, the Europeans were quick to start talking union. As early as 1950, Germany and France decided to unite their steel and coal industries, and in 1957, the same year Sputnik was launched, the Treaty of Rome was signed and the European Economic Union, the EEC, was born. The Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and the Treaty of Maastricht was signed in 1992. Now that the European Union had reached the point of no return, the wall was no longer needed. It was demolished while Russia went back to being the feudal serf regime that it had always been. At the time, many wondered about the USSR being little more than smoke and mirrors, but the Gorgon Sisters kept the image alive as best they could. The propaganda techniques used in the case of the USSR scarecrow were so efficient and cost-effective that the City is today successfully using the same technique in North Korea, albeit for other reasons.

If the geopolitical U.S.A.-Europe-USSR sandwich theory seems far-fetched, circumstantial evidence can be had from Louis T. McFadden’s infamous report to Congress in November 1934. McFadden was a respected Congressman who had started as a humble bank clerk and had become President of the Pennsylvania Bankers’ Association before being elected as a Republican Representative to the sixty-fourth Congress in 1914. Congressman Louis T. McFadden was Chairman of the very prestigious House Committee on Banking and Currency from 1920 to 1931. Nonetheless, this extraordinary citizen was accused of being an anti-Semite because he fought the FED.

When he accused the FED of having caused the Great Depression, and also of having funded the Bolshevik Revolution, it was taken very seriously in the City. It got worse when, in 1932, he moved to impeach President Hoover while bringing conspiracy charges against the FED, and when again in 1933, he moved to impeach the Secretary of the Treasury, two assistant Secretaries of the Treasury and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, as well as the officers and directors of the FED’s twelve regional banks. His attempts failed, but there were subsequently three attempts on his life. The third one was successful when he died of poisoning on a visit to New York City, in 1936. No order is ever given for drastic action of this kind, but there is always an appropriately placed ‘suit’ to do what ‘needs’ to be done.

The City cannot exist without democracy, and democracy cannot exist without the empowerment of the people, therefore, the City bankers are sometimes forced to play with life and death like a heart surgeon. Taking a healthy heart from a dead person, and a sick one from a live person, and switching them, is not something too many people can do. And while the results are not always those hoped for, who can say with any degree of certainty if it’s warranted? The only things that matter in drastic world undertakings such as war is for its motive to be dispassionate and for the goal to be for the good of all, at least in the long term. After two world wars, there was Bretton Woods, and since then, the world is officially under one financial roof. If we believe that, as we should, we also believe that the City bankers can’t possibly want to destroy their superb structure that took 400 years to build. We can be absolutely sure there will never be another major war, that is, unless it’s launched from outer space.

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33-MASS COMMUNICATION

 

Our world, the western world, started when the Jews and Huguenots, the enemies of the Holy Roman Empire, created democracy in England in 1689. After getting a foothold in Amsterdam in 1602, they were extremely successful running the Dutch East India Company and eventually set up their headquarters in the City, in London. In 1688, the bankers were finally able to finance the election of the people’s representatives and give them a proper parliament. Democracy as it became known, was a win-win situation for all. Parliamentarians were forever asking the bankers for loans, and in wanting to safeguard this great source of credit, the politicians made sure they collected taxes in order to pay back the loans, or at least the interest. The bankers were sure of having their loans repaid for the first time in their history and they invested in research and development at a frenzied pace.

At first, there was no infrastructure, and communication was limited to the printed page. The printing press had been invented by Johannes Gutenberg in 1440, but the rotary press did not see the day until 1846. The Industrial Revolution was slow in getting going, but it got in gear when, in 1765, James Watt invented a converter for the world’s first steam cylinder and piston engine that had been invented by Denis Papin, a Huguenot from Hesse, in 1690. As of 1765, the Industrial Revolution had a full head of steam so to speak. Manufacturing goods and mining with steam power, and transporting those merchandises along roads and canals became commonplace. Other major inventions like Eli Whitney’s cotton gin in 1793, Elias Howe’s sewing machine with interchangeable parts in 1846, and Henry Bessemer’s steelmaking process in 1857 contributed to the production of goods, but the concept of globalization envisaged by Nathan in the City in 1810, and by his father before him, depended entirely on communications.

Nicephore Niepce created photography in 1820, Samuel Morse the telegraph in 1844, Charles Havas, Paul Reuter and Bernhard Wolf, news agencies in 1845, and from there, communications increased exponentially. When Bessemer invented his steelmaking process in 1857, railroad tracks were finally cast in a durable material and the construction of railroads mushroomed. Then came Graham Bell with the telephone in 1876, Thomas Edison with the light bulb in 1879, and Nikola Tesla with the a/c induction motor in 1887. However, when George Westinghouse bought Tesla’s patent and triumphed over Edison with his a/c current distribution system in 1891, that changed the industrial world as well as people’s lives.

As research and development continued to receive astounding amounts of credit, images and voices started travelling through the air over long distances. Reginald Aubrey Fessenden transmitted the human voice without wires in 1900, and Hollywood started producing films that seduced the whole world as early as 1910. After Henry Ford got the combustion engine rolling with his Model-T, and the Wright Bros. got it flying in 1903, films made in America, the dream nation, were seen around the world. Although images started travelling through the air with TV in 1926, it was the talking colour film introduced in 1930 that entrenched the ‘image is the message’ concept imagined by Marshall McLuhan. When the first computer and its mouse arrived in 1976, and especially when Tim Berners-Lee’s World Wide Web came along in 1990, we became information addicts. But it was the smartphone in 1993 that captivated our total attention and hardwired us to the news agencies, transforming us into smombies in the process. It took 3 million years to get to steam energy, but it took a mere 225 years more to get the whole world connected.

Hollywood was a good example of how research and development money gets things done. In the early 1900s, filmmakers, almost exclusively Jewish, began moving to California. The idea was to create the film industry in an unreachable place where they would be free to use with impunity the usurped patents owned by Thomas Edison and Eastman Kodak of New Jersey . If an agent from New Jersey came out west to sue them, all the filmmakers had to do was make a quick temporary escape to Mexico. There was really not much Thomas Edison or George Eastman could do in order to protect their patents.

The first film, ‘In old California’, was produced in 1910. From there, the Laemmle’s, the Zukor’s, the Frohman’s, the Lasky’s, the Goldfish’s, the Abrams’, the Warner’s, the DeMille’s, the Cohn’s, the Selznick’s, the Sarnoff’s, the Zanuck’s, the Loew’s and the Mayer’s, all friends of the City banking dynasty, made the industry prosper with lightning speed. The radio and film industries launched the 20th century into the realm of globalization, and in the blink of an eye, television, computers, mobile phones and airplanes turned us into world citizens.